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TITLE:

A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY ON GASTRO-ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AND ITS RISK FACTORS AMONG LOCAL POPULATION OF PAKISTAN

AUTHORS:

Dr Maryam Sattar, Dr Seema Kanwal, Dr Ayesha Abbas

ABSTRACT:

Introduction: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most common diseases in Europe and the United States, and affects severely the quality of life pertinent to such symptoms as heartburn and acid regurgitation. Objectives of the study: The main objective of the study is to analyze the gastro-esophageal reflux disease and its risk factors among local population of Pakistan. Material and methods: The data was collected from Benazir Bhutto Hospital, Rawalpindi during April to July 2018. This is basically a cross sectional study. The data was collected from 500 patients of both male and female. Patients presenting with typical symptoms of GERD, over a period of six months were enrolled. Information on patient demography, medical history, family history, prescription patterns, lifestyle factors and dietary habits were collected using a standard DCF. Results: The data were collected from 500 patients. Approximately one quarter of the participants reported having received 13 or more years of education. There were 101 (9.4 %) participants reporting a history of pan masala chewing, among whom 67 were men and 34 women. Smoking was more common than pan masala chewing (156 out of 1072, 14.6 %), and there were only three women among the ever smokers. In the present study, we surveyed the six items including the cardinal symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation) and atypical symptoms (nausea, night sleep disturbance, stomach pain, and additional medication) to define the presence of GERD. Conclusion: It is concluded that the risk factors predisposing for GERD in the study population include increasing age and BMI, living in urban area, lower educational level, and pan masala chewing.

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