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TITLE:

ANALYSIS OF IMPACT OF METABOLIC SYNDROME ON NUTRIENTS INTAKE AMONG FEMALES

AUTHORS:

Dr Quratulain, Dr Rabbia Afzal, Dr Shahrukh

ABSTRACT:

Introduction: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized by a clustering of abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus, which are considered to contribute to increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Aims and objectives: The basic aim of the study is to find the impact of metabolic syndrome on nutrients intakes among females in Pakistani environment. Material and methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in hospitals of Gujrat during 2018. In this study we find the impact of metabolic syndromes on nutrients intake. All participants with MetSyn at baseline were excluded in this study. 50 patients were randomly selected as the case group, and 123 patients agreed to participate and provided complete information. For the control group without MetS, 150 age- , gender- and residence area–matched subjects with no history of obesity, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus were selected, and the data from 135 subjects were analyzed. Results: The patients with MetS had significantly higher blood pressure, BMI, and WC and higher levels of TG, TC, LDL-c, FBG, and UA but lower HDL-c levels than those in the control group. The patients with MetS were more likely to be smokers and had a lower education level. In regard to dietary nutrient intake status, intake of energy, total fat, cholesterol, and sodium were significantly higher and intake of vitamin E and magnesium were relatively deficient in the patients with MetS compared with the control group. Conclusion: It is concluded that vitamin B group pattern was negatively associated with the risk of MetS. Our findings suggest that intake of B vitamins as a whole might be a simple and effective way to prevent or slow the development of MetS.

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