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TITLE:

STUDY TO KNOW THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SKIN MANIFESTATIONS AND CD4 COUNTS IN HIV DIAGNOSED PATIENTS

AUTHORS:

Dr.Maliha Bilal, Dr.Shehzaib Sohail, Dr.Muhammad Ali

ABSTRACT:

Objective: In HIV positive patient’s skin manifestation are usual clinical features. We arranged this study to obtain the objective of documenting these skin manifestations and association with CD4 cell counts in HIV positive patients. Study design: A Descriptive study. Place and duration: In the Department of Dermatology Mayo Hospital Lahore for one year duration from February 2018 to February 2019. Methodology: The mode of this study was descriptive in nature and the patients who were included in this study were examined for skin disorders; carefully undertaken by a dermatologist. The CD4 count of the patients were acquired through patient records. T tests were used for data analysis via independent samples. Results: 66 (94.3%) patients who were a part of this study had skin infections, the least count was one. The most common cause of skin disease was found to be fungal infection. Other most common occurrences were of mucocutaneous problems including pallor, gingivitis, photosensitive skin, itching candidiasis, folliculitis, tinea versicolor and seborrheic dermatitis. The most common of these diseases mentioned above was gingivitis. (P <0.05) Cell count of CD4 was found to be lower in subjects exhibiting viral and bacterial skin disease. Conclusion: The study and its results signpost that HIV patients exhibit skin problems as a norm. Lowest CD4 count is found in patients who are going through advanced phases of skin disorder. It is recommended after carefully keeping in mind the results of this study that HIV positive patients should go thorough skin examination to avoid dermatologic issues. This will help increase the quality of life in HIV positive patients. Key words: CD4 count, skin manifestation, bacterial skin disease.

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